Join Me in Peru AND Bolivia for a Photo Adventure
Apr08

Join Me in Peru AND Bolivia for a Photo Adventure

It’s with great pleasure that I announce that I’m now booking a second photo tour in South America in 2015! Since the booking for the first workshop – which is taking place in Peru, May 2015 – has been so successful, we decided to add another date to accommodate the people that couldn’t make the first trip’s dates.  Specifically, we had in mind the many teachers who let us know that they could only come in the summer months.  Well, here’s your chance. Get all the booking info here. A Bolivian Twist This tour, which will run starting July 13th in Cusco, Peru will not be the exact same workshop as the previous, however, as well be adding a Bolivian twist to it all. The tour will commence in Cusco, Peru where we will visit famous Peruvian sites like Ollantaytambo, Lake Titicaca and, of course, Machu Picchu.  From there, we will work into Bolivia and experience some incredible places such as the Uyuni Salt Flats, the Potosi Mines, and the great city of La Paz. All of the places we visit on this trip are tremendously photogenic, and we’re going to have a blast.  I hope you join us! Dates and Prices Start Date: July 13, 2015 in Cusco, Peru End Date: July 26, 2015 in La Paz, Peru Cost Per Person: $2,990usd For more information on the itinerary, FAQs, and what’s included in the tour, please head over to the info page for the photo workshop on Adventure.com What’s a Photography Workshop? I can’t speak for all photography workshops, because everyone operates differently.  However, in our workshops the goal is to have a genuine travel experience well not feeling rushed to take our photos, as well being in the right places at the right time for photography.  Moreover, these photo workshops give participants a look into what life is like as a professional travel photographer.   Our workshops also include 1-on-1 time with the professional photographers to discuss things like photo editing, and to do image critiques.  Of course, a big part of a photography tour is also meeting other people who have a passion for photography. So, whether you’re a professional photographer looking to build your portfolio quickly, an amateur photographer thinking about making the jump to pro, or just a hobbyist that doesn’t want to feel rush in the hobby, these trips are for you. More Information If you need some more information from me directly, you can always get a hold of me on my contact page.  So, if you have any questions, feel free to shoot me a quick...

Read More
Join Me in Peru AND Bolivia for a Photo Adventure
Apr01

Join Me in Peru AND Bolivia for a Photo Adventure

It’s with great pleasure that I announce that I’m now booking a second photo tour in South America in 2015! Since the booking for the first workshop – which is taking place in Peru, May 2015 – has been so successful, we decided to add another date to accommodate the people that couldn’t make the first trip’s dates.  Specifically, we had in mind the many teachers who let us know that they could only come in the summer months.  Well, here’s your chance. Get all the booking info here. A Bolivian Twist This tour, which will run starting July 13th in Cusco, Peru will not be the exact same workshop as the previous, however, as well be adding a Bolivian twist to it all. The tour will commence in Cusco, Peru where we will visit famous Peruvian sites like Ollantaytambo, Lake Titicaca and, of course, Machu Picchu.  From there, we will work into Bolivia and experience some incredible places such as the Uyuni Salt Flats, the Potosi Mines, and the great city of La Paz. All of the places we visit on this trip are tremendously photogenic, and we’re going to have a blast.  I hope you join us! Dates and Prices Start Date: July 13, 2015 in Cusco, Peru End Date: July 26, 2015 in La Paz, Bolivia Cost Per Person: $2,990usd For more information on the itinerary, FAQs, and what’s included in the tour, please head over to the info page for the photo workshop on Adventure.com What’s a Photography Workshop? I can’t speak for all photography workshops, because everyone operates differently.  However, in our workshops the goal is to have a genuine travel experience well not feeling rushed to take our photos, as well being in the right places at the right time for photography.  Moreover, these photo workshops give participants a look into what life is like as a professional travel photographer.   Our workshops also include 1-on-1 time with the professional photographers to discuss things like photo editing, and to do image critiques.  Of course, a big part of a photography tour is also meeting other people who have a passion for photography. So, whether you’re a professional photographer looking to build your portfolio quickly, an amateur photographer thinking about making the jump to pro, or just a hobbyist that doesn’t want to feel rush in the hobby, these trips are for you. More Information If you need some more information from me directly, you can always get a hold of me on my contact page.  So, if you have any questions, feel free to shoot me a quick...

Read More
On Guilt and Genocide at the Killing Fields in Cambodia
May09

On Guilt and Genocide at the Killing Fields in Cambodia

I’ve been to a lot of intense places on this planet.  If you know my history, you’ll remember that I studied conflict in University.  I made it a bit of a mission to try to understand what causes conflict.  Beyond school, I’ve travelled to as many of these post-conflict regions as I could do, in search of trying to continue to observe and learn.  As such, a visit Cambodia meant that a stop at the Killing Fields at Choeung Ek in Phnom Penh was a necessity. It’s often hard to muster up an explanation of what it’s like walking into a place like this.  Before arriving, you already know you’re meant to be sad.  You know that you’re going to be demoralized, saddened and perhaps even lose hope for a second in humanity.  Before setting foot in a place where genocide – the murder of hundreds of people – took place, you know exactly how you should feel.  But still, there’s no preparing for the actually feeling, is there? In many ways, visiting places like the Killing Fields in Cambodia as a tourist can make one feel guilty.  It’s something that I feel more than anything every time I set foot in a spot like this.  Calling it a tourist “attraction” hurts more than anything that could come out of my mouth.  As a tourist, we almost feel like we’re taking advantage of the horrors of the past to impose a feeling that we’re doing something for the betterment of the planet.  We feel guilty for visiting now, and we feel guilty that people just like us allowed this to happen, and continue to let things like this to happen around the world. But when it comes down to it, I don’t think of these places as “attractions” anymore.  The Killing Fields at Choeung Ek isn’t a travel destination or an attraction, it’s a duty.  As travellers, it’s not our right to visit places like this, it’s a show of respect.  We don’t – or shouldn’t – come to these places for anything related to us.  We do this to show respect for those who died, for those who fought for justice, and to try to find forgiveness for those who wronged humanity.  We should visit the Killing Fields in Phnom Penh, and all places like it, to show people that the sacrifices of those who died will not be forgotten. People come to places like this every day and use the line “I’ve come to make sure that mankind doesn’t make the same mistake again,” but, is it not clear that the same mistakes are forged out constantly?...

Read More
Phnom Penh: Not What I Expected
Apr27

Phnom Penh: Not What I Expected

After reading articles from other travel bloggers and hearing stories from fellow backpackers, I have to admit that I had a greatly distorted image of Phnom Penh going in.  Perhaps the average traveller is just getting soft, maybe they always were, or maybe there is a side of Phnom Penh that is actually incredibly dangerous.  Regardless, I had begun to wonder what I was getting myself into.  Was I about to set foot in yet another bad situation like I had so many times before?  There had to be a real reason why so many backpackers warned me to just avoid Cambodia’s capital, right?   Instead, of taking the advice of so many, I went.  And when I arrived, I was markedly confused.  To my eyes, it was Bamako without the chaotic traffic.  It was a city on a wide stretch of river lined with cafes and restaurants, perfectly paved streets, and tuk-tuk drivers that didn’t find the need to yell fourteen times at me, or get in my face in regards to whether or not I wanted a ride somewhere.  It was tight inner city streets full of smiling kids begging for photos, and friendly hellos. Maybe it was just the change coming from Vietnam where, as a tourist, I was the ears to an unrelenting choir of stabbing “hello, hello, hello, helloooo” everywhere I went.  Or maybe, backpackers are full of shit.  Maybe Phnom Penh is too far from a beach and a mojito.  Perhaps there aren’t enough bikinis and jello shots to appease the average backpacker fantasy of Southeast Asia in Phnom Penh. Sure, Cambodia’s capital isn’t roses and lolipops either.  After exploring the side streets and local markets, it was obvious that there was a bit of an edge to the city.  At times, I got resentful looking glaces as I walked.  But in general, It was far from the squall of darkness and doom that had so often been portrayed to me by others.  I’d even heard reference from some that Cambodia should be avoided all together these days, as it has become too dangerous for tourists. It’s all just sensationalism isn’t it?  It’s just another example of tourists making their travels sound hard at the expense of reality.  It’s perhaps just another excuse to avoid actual local life instead of baking on a beach, dancing with 4,000 other tourists on a full moon-lit beach, then spending all day sleeping in a hammock while on your iPhone talking to family members back home, telling them how “you’ve begun to find yourself”. In so many ways, Southeast Asia has been exactly what I expected.  It’s the land...

Read More
What you should know BEFORE Visiting Halong Bay
Mar18

What you should know BEFORE Visiting Halong Bay

You’ve seen the photos before, I’m sure.  If you’re keen on travel or photography, I’m sure that the images of Halong Bay are nearly crystal clear to you, aren’t they.  You probably imagine seeing those brilliant orange and yellow junk boats floating by the dozen through the blissfully still waters amidst a stunning collection of statuesque pillars of land that pierce through the sea like wild canine teeth.  And well much of that is possible, I have to tell you, you should probably temper your expectations. This isn’t so much a counter-argument to visiting Halong Bay, I would never dissuade you from visiting.  Moreover, I thought Halong Bay was absolutely fascinating.  From a geographical standpoint, it really is one of the marvels of our world.  I could have spent a week just floating through the seas exploring the caves, hills, and beaches.  But, it’s not that easy.  It’s not the idealize world you might imagine.  These are some of the things you can expect, and how to avoid falling into the traps. Junk Boats are Rare If you think you’re going to see a number of these things you’re wrong.  If you think you’ll be riding around on one, you couldn’t be further from reality – unless you have big bucks.  The truth is that most people don’t see any junk boats on their trip through Halong Bay.  The boats you’ll be cruising through are nice, though.  You’ll likely have a dinning and indoor seating area, a big open roof with seating, and obviously the rooms if you’re on an overnight boat.  It’s not necessarily a bad thing, in fact I quite liked the boats we travelled with, it just might not be what you expect. And, it would have been nice to get a photo of a couple. On a day-trip, you’ll only scratch the surface The day trips, or 1-day trips as they call them, are really only going to get you into see a couple small islands.  You’ll likely be taken right to a floating village where you’ll have the opportunity to kayak for about 10 minutes, or out to a cave.  Then, you’ll be taken to another cave, and if you’re lucky a beach or a hike up to a viewpoint.  You’ll also likely spend quite a bit of time waiting around. If you want a really thorough trip through Halong Bay, you’re really going to need to book at least two days.  Better yet, when you’re done the boat cruises, go to hang out a while on Cat Ba Island which is a fantastic island, especially in the off-season. On a tour, you’ll not...

Read More
Why Aqaba?
Feb11

Why Aqaba?

When getting organized for Jordan, I’ll be quick to admit that I had no idea where Aqaba was.  Honestly, I didn’t even know it existed before my trip was planned.  As a traveller, when entering a new country I’ll generally just do the most logical thing and book a trip to the capital and go from there.  However, with the recent addition of Turkish Airlines flights to Aqaba, Jordan I was excited to see what the fuss was about.  After spending a week based in Aqaba, exploring all the incredible wonders of this near-perfect middle eastern travel destination, it’s easy to see why this city is set to be the host of many oncoming travellers in the years to come. So why Aqaba?  Here are some of my thoughts as to why you should make Aqaba a destination on your Jordan travel plans, and why it’s an obvious point of entry. Free Visas Tiffany and I each had a stash of money tucked away for our entrance visa to Jordan.  However, as we passed through immigration we ended up with a visa stamped in our passports, but no one asked us for any money.  We soon found out that there are no visa fees for travellers from selected countries into Jordan at Aqaba.  That’s about $30 better spent on that unreal Jordanian food, right? Special Economic Zone The reason for the free visa in Aqaba is that the area sits in a special economic zone known as ASEZA (Aqaba Special Economic Zone Authority).  This means that there aren’t the same taxes things as you’ll find in other parts of the country.  For tourists, the special economic zone means that you’ll find all sorts of things cheaper in Aqaba.  From electronics to hotel rooms, you’ll save a nice chunk of change in Aqaba. Hassle-Free As a port of entry, it doesn’t get easier than Aqaba.  Not only are the visas free, but since Turkish Airlines is the only international carrier arriving here, there are no hassles and no big lines to push through.  The airport in Aqaba is essentially just a couple rooms.  You won’t have to fight with 400 taxis to get in town, and there isn’t going to be that big shock you might get arriving somewhere incredibly busy like Amman.  It really is a hassle-free entry into the country. On departure, rather than arriving 3 hours early for an international flight, we arrived about an hour before the flight was due to depart.  That being said, we did have to deal with some fairly incompetent security personnel who seemed to think that any liquids (shaving cream, sunscreen,...

Read More
Real Time Analytics
Want to improve your photography? Subscribe to my Travel Photography YouTube Channel! You will not regret it!