Recapping Our Morocco Travel Photography Workshop
Mar27

Recapping Our Morocco Travel Photography Workshop

As you all likely know, Jeff Bartlett and I ran one of our travel photography workshops in Morocco last month.  The trip was an absolute blast, and a perfect adventure.  We had an awesome group, and got lucky with weather most of the way along the way.  Of course, like any bit of travel, it wasn’t without its fair share of unexpected events.  For example, when in the Sahara Desert we got hit with a massive sand storm, which was wild and left us with countless stories.  And then, in the Dades Gorge we got hit by an overnight blizzard which left the valley covered in snow, and shut down the pass across the High Atlas Mountains. But, it’s these unexpected adventures that make travel so much fun.  This is where the stories come from, and often the coolest photos. Before I get into the location-to-location recap from Morocco, I want to remind you that we’re booking our next photography adventure which will be a workshop and tour in Cuba!  This trip is filling fast, so if you’re interested, please let us know as soon as possible. Marrakesh Instead of go in depth into each destination, I just thought I’d share some of the images and quick anecdotes from each location.  This should serve to show a bit what you’d be getting into if you join one of our future trips to Morocco.  As of right now, the plan is to re-visit Morocco in a couple years.  It is just such a great destination, and so diverse in what it has to offer. We started, and ended, this travel photography workshop in Marrakesh. Casablanca and Rabat On our way to Chefchaoeun we made stops in Casablanca and Rabat. In Casablanca, we visited the Hassan II Mosque which is perhaps the most impressive piece of architecture in the country.  It’s also one of the few mosques in Morocco which allows non-Muslim tourists to enter on a tour.  From Casablanca, we pushed on to the capital city of Rabat where we visited some palaces and mausoleums. Chefchaouen Chef is one of my favourite destinations in Morocco.  It’s just fascinating to me.  The “blue city” is just that; it’s blue.  Nearly, every corner of the city is covered in blue paint.  And, the soft rock buildings make the city feel ancient.  It’s obviously a pretty unique destination.  The lack of cars and plethora of beautiful alleys, makes Chef a great place to wander and shoot photography.  The overview above the city, too, makes for a wonderful place to shoot imagery. Volubilis and Meknes On our way to Fes, we made a quick...

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Kwihala Camp and 3 Other Breathtaking Places to see Wild Elephants in  Africa
Mar08

Kwihala Camp and 3 Other Breathtaking Places to see Wild Elephants in Africa

Visiting an elephant sanctuary is nice…you can see the animals up close, you can even stroke them, but nothing beats seeing elephant in their natural habitat, strutting across the African savannah. Being in the wild amongst these huge, majestic, intelligent creatures is an utterly breathtaking experience, and within just a few minutes, you’ll learn so much more than you would by spending days with a captive elephant. You’ll see entire herds protect babies, marvel at how desert elephant treat the scant vegetation with the utmost of care, and if your vehicle happens to separate a herd crossing the road, you’ll be met with incredible displays of mock-charging. Wild elephants are at the top of most safari travellers’ must-see lists – you just need to know where to find them. Here, we highlight three of the most breathtaking locations for viewing wild elephant in Africa, from the infamous Kwihala Camp in Tanzania all the way to Samburu in Kenya. Tanzania With around 40,000 elephants roaming its land, Tanzania boasts one of the largest wild elephant populations in the world. The country yields 16 national parks, plus a variety of game and forest reserves, so you’ve got plenty of choices when trying to find a Tanzanian safari to fit in with your itinerary. Ruaha National Park is the largest reserve in Tanzania, yet it’s not inundated by travellers, so your wild elephant sightings will be relatively uninterrupted. It’s here you’ll find the Kwihala Camp, which is one of the most highly regarded camps in the whole of Africa, famous for its in-depth walking and vehicle safaris that are perfect for spotting wild elephant. Tarangire National Park is another great option, especially if you’re visiting between July and mid November, as it’s renowned for elephant migration. Even if you’ll be in Tanzania during the wet season (December-May), Tarangire still provides an intriguing visit, as it’s possibly the only place you’ll encounter large breeding herds of elephants – and by large, we mean hundreds! Botswana Botswana is where you go if you want an idyllic safari experience; the country is sparsely populated, and the entire northern hemisphere has given over to safari. There are an estimated 70,000 elephants in Botswana, and interestingly, they are considered to be the largest elephants in terms of body size. As so many tourists travel through the country, the wild elephant here are relatively used to travellers, so you may be able to get slightly closer than you would in other areas. The Ngoma Safari Lodge is popular amongst those who want to visit the northern part of Chobe, which is well known for its unique wilderness appeal,...

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Destination Morocco: Want to Join Me?
Nov21

Destination Morocco: Want to Join Me?

After a very successful photography tour and workshop in Peru this May, I’m excited to announce my next big photo adventure tour.  We’re going to Morocco!  Want to come along for the ride? About Photography in Morocco Without a doubt, Morocco is one of the most photogenic countries I’ve ever travelled.  It seems like there is a worthy photo around every corner.  From an architecture standpoint, you have the stunning mosques, exciting medinas, beautiful Berber villages, and impressive cities like “The Blue City” of Chefchaouen.  As far as nature is concerned, Morocco is incredibly varied.  You have prairies, gorges, high-altitude mountains, stunning coastlines, and the Sahara Desert.  And, of course, the people themselves make for fantastic subjects. In Morocco, you’ll definitely fill your fare share of memory cards, but you’ll also have a great opportunity to dive deep into this country that’s so rich in culture and history. How Can you Join? Like the tour in Peru, I’m taking on a maximum of 12 participants.  We’re running things on a first-come first-serve basis, so sign up quickly as to not miss out! You can sign up, and get much more in depth information on the tour/workshop here. What’s the Itinerary? The tour starts and ends in Marrakesh.  It begins on the 6th of February, 2016 and runs for 13 days.  I’ve included a very brief description of the tour below, but if you’d like the full in depth itinerary, you can download the pdf version of it here. February 6 – Arrival in Marrakesh February 7 – Photo tour of Marrakesh February 8 – To Chefchaouen via Rabat and Casablanca February 9 – Full Day in Chefchaouen February 10 – To Fes via Volubilis and Meknes February 11 – Photo tour of Fes February 12 – Free Day in Fes February 13 – The Sahara via The Middle Atlas Mountains February 14 – The Sahara February 15 – Dades Gorge via Todra Gorge February 16 – The High Atlas Mountains February 17 – Marrakesh via The Atlas Mountains February 18 – Tour ends in Marrakesh Who are the Instructors? I’m really excited to this time be joining forces with the incredibly talented Jeff Bartlett.  I’ve known Jeff for ages, and not only is he a fantastic photographer, but a great person, and very good photography instructor. Check out Jeff’s portfolio here. What is a Photography Tour/Workshop? For those not familiar with my trips.  What I do is take your classic adventure tour and place a photography edge to it.  Moreover, not only is the trip set up with photography in mind, you’ll have 2 professional photographers along side providing instruction.  We offer...

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Video: Kruger National Park
Dec14

Video: Kruger National Park

About 10 minutes after posting this video from Kruger National Park to YouTube I realized that I actually had way more wildlife footage from my 5 days in the park.  On somewhat slow internet, I was completely unwilling to re-do this video to get them in, so I’m sorry if there isn’t as much wildlife footage as I’d like in this video of the safari through Kruger.  I also have to say, filming wildlife as a photographer is a chore.  Basically, I’m more concerned about getting photos so I’ll take as many shots as I can, and if the animal doesn’t disappear, then I’ll take some video. Anyways, this video is shot in its entirety inside Kruger National Park which is obviously South Africa’s biggest draw card for tourists.  Maybe seasoned safari travellers will claim Kruger to be too crowded and developed. And on weekends, I can see that being the case for sure. For me, however, I thought it was fine.  Of all the other big African safaris I took part in, this one had the most diverse wildlife as well as the most diverse geography.  In fact, in one day I managed to see the entire big five in Kruger, I don’t think there’s another park nearby where that would be likely. Kruger National Park wildlife is not only high quality but very accessible. I had a bit of an adventure in Kruger National Park too.  I spend nearly an entire day fighting to get my keys out of my car at one of the campsites since I somehow managed to lock them in.  Still despite my own stupidity, I managed to have an incredible time in the park.  I covered basically the entire Kruger National Park map from bottom all the way to the top and spent nearly all of the daylight hours out searching for wildlife.  It really was intense.  I loved it so much, there was a point I seriously considered just moving into the park permanently to become a full-time wildlife photographer. Ok, so that’s it from Kruger.  I have a couple more videos from South Africa still to come, so stay...

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Video: The Night Train to Johannesburg
Dec11

Video: The Night Train to Johannesburg

  After spending a good part of time along the coast of South Africa, and taking part in one of the many safaris in South Africa at Addo National Elephant Park, I finally headed inland via the train from East London to Johannesburg.  I didn’t really know what to expect with this train because I really hadn’t heard of any travellers taking the train. Most backpackers in South Africa tend to pile themselves into the Baz Bus.  However, the train was much cheaper, and from the looks of it was more comfortable as well. The train was a bit worn down, definitely in need of some serious upgrades.  The train was also really slow.  I was told it was going to be about a 12 hour trip and it ended up being 16 hours.  That being said, it really was a pleasant journey, and I’d take a 16 hour train ride over an 8 hour bus ride any day.  The train from East London to Johannesburg had food available, drinks, and the staff came by with optional linens for the beds if you wanted them.  Sleeper cars have 4 beds in each, but I just had one other person in my room with me, so it really wasn’t that bad at all. Anyways, in the next video I go on safari in Kruger National Park, so stay tuned for...

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